Where the Whacky Franz Boas Pictures Come From

Where the Whacky Franz Boas Pictures Come From

Ya’ll know what I’m talking about, right? These pictures get used all the time on the Internet and in class. Memeworthy in extremis, they manage to pay homage to a founder of our discipline while simultaneously to taking him too seriously — an ironic, typically anthropological move. But where do they actually come from? In honor of the new twitter account for my history of anthropology tumblr, Highly Accurate Pictures of Anthropologists, I tracked down the original picture. As some {+}

What I Wish I Knew about Anthropology and Disability: Notes toward a more enabling anthropology

What I Wish I Knew about Anthropology and Disability: Notes toward a more enabling anthropology

This post was written by Michele Friedner, with Devva Kasnitz, and Zoë Wool. This year, In the wake of yet another remarkably inaccessible and access-ignorant AAA meeting–and as many of us dive back into teaching with questions of inequity and social difference whirling within and beyond the classroom–it seems there’s no time like the present to highlight the ableism that structures anthropology. Anthropologists have always been interested in categories of difference in field sites and in the classroom. However, disability {+}

Hurry Up and Wait, Part 2: Arrival – #RoR2018

Hurry Up and Wait, Part 2: Arrival – #RoR2018

After focusing my last couple weeks spending quality time with my loved ones, this week I have arrived in Dakar. This is my sixth time here and unquestionably my smoothest entry – the shiny new airport was easy to navigate, despite having just opened to great criticism in the middle of December. Seems like the kinks got worked out, or they were just having a good day. Passport control was fast, customs was nearly undetectable, and my host met me {+}

Three Styles in the History of Anthropology

Three Styles in the History of Anthropology

Anthropology has an unhealthy relationship to its past. Approaches range from highly fetishized, almost ritual reading of sacralized texts like The Gift and The Nuer to intense, context-free denunciations of past practitioners based on their race, gender, and emplacement in nineteenth century. In fact, perhaps the most common relationship anthropologists have to their history is ignorance. Anthropologists often have little sense of what the discipline has achieved (or not achieved) in the past, and famously reinvent the fundamental insights of {+}

Start an Anthropology Career in 2018

Start an Anthropology Career in 2018

Lets put aside for the moment all the usual warnings about pursuing an academic career. Lets say that you are old enough to take responsibility for your own bad decisions and have somehow gotten it in your head that, despite everything you’ve heard, you really like the idea of becoming an anthropologist. If you really will not be dissuaded . . . “Welcome to the club!” But also know that competition is stiff. You probably have better chances of landing {+}

Anthrodendum: 2017 in Review

Anthrodendum: 2017 in Review

2017 was a very productive year for Anthro{dendum} and to kick off another year in the anthropology blogosphere, I bring our annual year in review! Our three most popular posts: “What you can REALLY do with an anthropology degree”  An honest and sobering look at the job prospectives for those with anthropology degrees. Hopefully, this will be used as a reference for undergraduates and other budding anthropologists in 2018. “Society Must Be Defended: Join us for a Read-In on 20 January 2017” {+}

My History of Anthropology Syllabus

My History of Anthropology Syllabus

This semester I taught ANTH 490, the History of Anthropology. It is a required class for our majors and is sort of a ‘capstone’ for their anthropology experience, despite the fact that we have a three field department and I only cover sociocultural anthropology. This was my first time teaching the course, and I wanted to give the students a sense of the anthropological canon reformed — something that had both classic readings but also presented previously excluded or marginal {+}

A note to the exhausted anthropology student

A note to the exhausted anthropology student

It’s the end of the term. You’ve handed in your papers, you’ve written your last exams. You’ve put the last few months behind you, and hopefully you’re able to spend time with kindred folks over the holidays — be they friends, family, or kin of any other configuration. Take this time to do the things you need to do to nurture yourself. As someone who struggled immensely in my undergraduate, I want to tell you that you can do this. {+}

The Politics of Explaining Taiwan

The Politics of Explaining Taiwan

Imagine if, when writing a paper on Donald Trump, you had to start your paper by saying the following:1 The United States emerged from the thirteen British colonies established along the East Coast of North America. Numerous disputes between Great Britain and the colonies following the French and Indian War led to the American Revolution, which began in 1775, and the subsequent Declaration of Independence in 1776. The United States embarked on a vigorous expansion across North America throughout the {+}

The Fieldnotes Ecosystem of #RoR2018

The Fieldnotes Ecosystem of #RoR2018

Early on in college, I took a lot of inspiration from John Hawks’ article calling for researchers to be transparent and engaging with their research in combination with Tricia Wang’s article outlining “open ethnography.” To me, Wang’s methodology was an answer to Hawks’ call. Somehow, I would have to navigate ethics review boards which weren’t at all familiar with using social media to disseminate information – and I did (which is a blog post for another time). Later, Samuel Collins {+}