Whose Streets: Protest and Drifting

Whose Streets: Protest and Drifting

As I drove home on I-95 from the AAAs this year thinking about conversations, old friends, future projects, Honduras, and the tax bill, I heard a car swoosh by me. Immediately sitting up, I knew there would be more. I looked in the rear view mirror and found myself surrounded by fast moving vehicles, all with shaded windows, souped up engines, and a speed that made the rest of us all look like lumbering slow pokes. It was like suddenly {+}

How I Write Interview Instruments – #RoR2018

How I Write Interview Instruments – #RoR2018

It would be interesting to sit down and look at the interview instruments from every year that I’ve been doing research in Senegal to see how they evolve. From 2012, my junior year in college, we would find leading questions or questions that otherwise confine respondents to certain answers. Some questions just didn’t make sense. There were probably no probes. In 2013, my advisor worked closely with me to make sure that I was phrasing things more clearly and in {+}

The Relativity of Toxicity

The Relativity of Toxicity

I’ve been thinking a lot about toxicity lately. I live in Houston, one of the nation’s most toxic cities and the terminal point of the Houston shipping channel, which  (depending on how you count) is home to the largest concentration of petrochemicals in the world. I know this because I live here, which is also why I know a little bit about the virtual absence of zoning laws that invites heavy industry into the city, the questionable quality of the {+}

Strategies in Minimizing the Labor Intensive Process of Dissertation Research Proposal Writing and Some Tips on What to Keep in Mind – #RoR2018

Strategies in Minimizing the Labor Intensive Process of Dissertation Research Proposal Writing and Some Tips on What to Keep in Mind – #RoR2018

Before I get started, I want to point out that this article is aimed at pre-field graduate students and undergraduates, and that the context is working with American funding agencies. YMMV. As I mentioned in my previous blog, my dissertation research is supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSFGRFP) and the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship (FHDDRA). The former provides three years of funding that must be used in five years of graduate school. I can use {+}

About last night: Honduras Elections

About last night: Honduras Elections

BY ROSEMARY JOYCE Last night, the incumbent president of Honduras declared a state of emergency, suspending the constitutional guarantee of the right to move freely around the country. He ordered the armed forces and the police, whose militarization he has promoted, to remove protests that have closed roads, taken bridges, and occupied public spaces throughout the country. In his order to remove protesters, he added an order to remove protesters from private property as well– technically making it illegal for {+}

A journal of films? A journal of films!

A journal of films? A journal of films!

For the first time in the history of Visual Anthropology anthropological film can now be published on par with written articles, assessed by peers, and inscribed in international credential systems of academic publication as the Nordic Anthropological Film Association (NAFA) has launched this first edition of Journal of Anthropological Films (JAF) published by Bergen Open Access Publishing (BOAP). Amazeballs! The announcement that the Nordic Anthropological Film Association (NAFA) had launched the Journal of Anthropological Films (JAF) really blew me away. {+}

What flying a drone above the Agung volcano in Bali teaches us about the computerisation of the earth

What flying a drone above the Agung volcano in Bali teaches us about the computerisation of the earth

For the 100,000 or so people who had to leave their homes last month, and the equal numbers of travellers stuck on, or unable to get to Bali—the eruption of the Agung volcano has been devastating. But this has been a fascinating time for a scholar like myself who investigates the use of drones—unmanned and unwomanned aerial vehicles—in social justice, environmental activism, and crisis preparedness. Amazon drone delivery is developing in the UK, drone blood delivery is happening in Rwanda, {+}

Make Green OA your New Year’s resolution

Make Green OA your New Year’s resolution

Why should you care about Green Open Access? Self-archiving, also known as Green Open Access or simply Green OA , is a way for authors to allow at least partial access to their toll-gated work. You might care about this for political or practical reasons, or a combination of the two. As an added kink, depending on your institution or funding agency, you might need to conform to some kind of mandate about participating in Green OA. Open access allows {+}

What I Wish I Knew Before Becoming a Professor

What I Wish I Knew Before Becoming a Professor

There is power in wisdom, and sometimes wisdom rests in community. Over the years, as I’ve mentored grad students, I have shared with them the things I wished someone had told me before I became a (tenure-track) professor. My list, however, was only ever that: a list based on my personal experiences. Others had other stories to tell, and so this weekend, I reached out to twenty-odd professor friends to share what was on their lists. The crowd-sourced list below {+}

Being a Chair: Some Tips for Protecting Time

Being a Chair: Some Tips for Protecting Time

I’m about to hand over after being chair of a department for over four years. Being a chair is a bit like death and taxes.  If you are lucky enough  to  be  employed on a long term contract in an academic institution you will probably end up formally managing your department. More realistically, given the ways that we as academics seek to  manage ourselves and strive to defy what universities define as  `leadership’, you will end up trying to manage {+}