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anthropology of environments: what I learned from the horseshoe crabs

anthropology of environments: what I learned from the horseshoe crabs

“Would you believe me now If I told you I got caught up in a wave? Almost gave it away Would you hear me out If I told you I was terrified for days? Thought I was gonna break” — Maggie Rogers, Light On I spent the better part of last year living and working in the US, falling asleep every night only two blocks from the mysterious lull of Long Island Sound — the weight and presence of water seeping {+}

The not-so-natural beach

The not-so-natural beach

Growing up, I always imagined the beach to be a natural place. I think it’s safe to say that this sentiment may be pretty common among many beachgoers. It’s easy to think of the beach as being somewhat “natural,” or at least close to that thing some people call “nature.” This is a short piece, so I won’t go down the what is nature!? rabbit hole for now. By natural I mean something along the lines of “not caused or {+}

Brazil is going to eat you up! {part 2}: about the Amazon fires

Brazil is going to eat you up! {part 2}: about the Amazon fires

A view of Indigenous Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau land in the Brazilian state of Rondônia being burned on Sept. 24, 2016. Photo: Gabriel Uchida. https://theintercept.com/2019/07/06/brazil-amazon-rainforest-indigenous-conservation-agribusiness-ranching/ So, the current climate in Brazil is completely devastated. Both the environmental climate and the public climate. Every day we have a new nonsense political news about this or that stupidity said by a far right politician. I think I got it right when I said last November that craziness was the main principle of the anthropophagic way {+}

A Call for Transformation: Shifting the Narratives

A Call for Transformation: Shifting the Narratives

This is the final post in a four-part blog series about transforming the academic-industrial complex, particularly museums. After introducing the proposal, I described ending the myth of neutrality and then discussed turning away from partnerships that exploit people and the earth. The last part of my call is to: shift the narratives that are being told and center authors beyond the institution’s traditional umbrella of authority A starting point is language. In A Million Black Anthropocenes or None, Katherine Yusoff {+}

A Call for Transformation: Dismantling Extractive Partnerships

A Call for Transformation: Dismantling Extractive Partnerships

After introducing my call for transformation within museums and the wider academic-industrial complex, and presenting the first part of my call, ending the myth of neutrality, I am writing to explain the second component of my call for transformation: dismantle partnerships with agencies and corporations that exploit people and the earth. Caring about people and the earth is not only part of the work of anthropologists and archaeologists, but should be part of our lives without the need for approbation {+}

Networking Nature: Tracking Terra, Sensing the Sea, Atmo-structures

Networking Nature: Tracking Terra, Sensing the Sea, Atmo-structures

Lately, when I have the pleasure of walking in the stacks of a regal, well-stocked, old library, and am in a devious mood, I imagine I am an alien roaming the halls of some temple of speciesism. I roll my eyes and mutter, “wow, another book by a human about a human’s perspective on something.” My alien observation describes all of human art, invention, science, and literature. More humans talking about humans and human’s views on other. Trapped in all-too-human {+}

Accumulation by media saturation

Accumulation by media saturation

Recently, I was at the doctor’s office (I’m fine, thanks) and I started sifting through all the magazines. You know, all the magazines that you don’t usually read that suddenly look slightly more appealing when there’s no other choice. Yes, those. And then I saw one of the covers. It was Sunset magazine’s August 2018 issue. I saw the picture and it just seemed familiar. I didn’t look too closely, but it reminded me of the Cape region of Baja {+}

A Call for Transformation: Ending the Myth of Neutrality

A Call for Transformation: Ending the Myth of Neutrality

Following my introductory post, I now describe the first of three parts of my call for transformation in museums and the academic-industrial complex. The first part is to: (1) end (finally) the narrative that museums and academic institutions are neutral. Museums and academic institutions are not neutral. Instead, they are often rooted in inequality: the accumulation of material, money, physical space, and knowledge, along with alliances with other institutions that include the state. As Nathan Sentance argues, institutions that receive {+}

I’m too tired to read your work — on refusing HAU Journal

I’m too tired to read your work — on refusing HAU Journal

This weekend, PhD student Taylor Genovese drew attention to the fact that the former Editor in Chief of HAU journal was granted an opportunity to write a final editorial in the journal (which I refuse to link to) — despite widespread accounts from former staff of highly problematic behaviours that were allowed to carry on at the journal. I have only read one screen cap of a portion of the editorial on twitter, and here’s why: life is too short to {+}

A Crisis Of (Feminist) Faith Through An Encounter In A Clinical Setting

A Crisis Of (Feminist) Faith Through An Encounter In A Clinical Setting

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Sreeparna Chattopadhyay. She is a Senior Research Scientist and Associate Professor at the Public Health Foundation of India. She finished her A.M. and Ph.D. from Brown University in 2007. Her research areas are in gender, health and, family and the law in India. Find her on Researchgate.  A Crisis Of (Feminist) Faith Through An Encounter In A Clinical Setting by Sreeparna Chattopadhyay   Introduction In the last ten years since I graduated with my doctoral degree, {+}